First Quarter Hooray!

Okay so I am a little happy to report that we are starting to review and take the periodical tests, one step at a time. I am allocating a day to review and a day to take the exams so Brook won’t be too stressed with TMI flooding all at the same time!

I love how he excels in English this school year. My son’s mother tongue is English, but he would always get an average test result. Sometimes, it’s even lower than what I feel is acceptable.

Why is that?

Because he doesn’t pay attention to the instructions and questions.

Surprisingly, during his first quarter with me, I have been seeing his test scores and they’re amazing! I wonder why? I know that his former English teacher had been superb! Not just as an educator, but also as a friend to the kids. I know the kind of love and attention she’s given to her students but I wonder why he got lower grades? Perhaps it’s their being so kind to the kids? Because you know how schools are nowadays, they’re totally careful with parents so I don’t know if that affects the learning of the children especially knowing how overly sheltered kids are nowadays. I mean, they’re spoiled at home, they’re spoiled in school. That’s double jeopardy! I cannot fault the teacher because I personally know she’s way better than most Elementary School teachers I’ve encountered in life and of course better than me, since I am not trained for this and I feel Brook liked her better. Perhaps it’s my being super strict at times? But I am liking his exam results with me. I was even secretly hoping he wouldn’t get a perfect score because I don’t want to grade him and give him 100 on everything. Wouldn’t it look sketchy? It’s super authentic though. It’s just that comparing to how he was in Grade 1, this is such a big leap not just on the exams, but also on the quizzes and performance tasks. He managed to memorize a 5-stanza poem in 2 days. Truly an achievement, especially for someone who used to cry his way out of everything! Amazing indeed! Praise God for his revived interest in learning!

He made minor boo-boos and I had to X it. He may not have gotten a perfect score but at least, I was able to teach him about the mistake and what to do about it next time. He still got excellent results! Perfectly imperfect for the card, hahaha!

I paired the English test with his Values exams — it was only supposed to be a review but after noticing that he is ready for the test, we did it and yes, he got a perfect score!

Last night, we reviewed Maths — we took a while in doing so because I noticed that he’s forgotten what we’ve learned about expanding equations — lessons about place value. We had to review every possible points that we have neglected to focus on and when he’s reviewed all the points required, I tried to skim some Computer notes with him and realized that he is confused with the classifications of Input and Output devices.

He especially got confused with the microphone because it’s indicated and classified as input “only” when in fact, it produces loud sound especially if we’re talking about the ‘mic’ for singing. It can certainly confuse anyone who doesn’t look at it in a technical perspective (especially for those like Brook who have just graduated from using the plastic echoing microphone from Toys R Us).

Brook insisted that it’s an output device. I told him that he does have a point and it’s valid. But we have to stick with the technicality of it. I showed him what the textbook says and I insisted that he stops his protest and just accept that it’s an input device (he had such long reasonings and I was getting impatient). I explained briefly (based on Google), that Microphones only output signal: they transduce sound waves into electrical audio signals which are then outputted from the microphone’s output connection. Microphones are input devices: they send/input data into a computer system for processing and I bet that you won’t hear the sound of the mic for singing if you didn’t have a speaker on — a speaker that is an output device. I tested him and made him say whether the devices I was enumerating one by one was an input or output device. He keeps on getting everything right except for the mic. I don’t know if it’s an act of rebellion or just hardheadedness. I was so frustrated because we had 25 rounds (I was counting), it was all the same when it comes to the good old microphone!

There were some tears shed last night. I know, he uses that to manipulate me. I was so frustrated because I don’t understand why he wouldn’t learn that particular pair: Mic = Input. My husband and I were unable to contain our exasperated laughter because despite the repeated Q&A about the microphone, he had insisted that it’s an output device — something we couldn’t really understand, I can sense he was scared, but he still did not cave in. When he saw us dying of suppressed laughter (I was teary eye, literally), Brook loosened up and felt relieved. He realized that I was not mad after all.

He finally agreed to the idea that it’s an input device.

Whether he’ll commit or not, we don’t know. We’ll see about that tonight.

14 thoughts on “First Quarter Hooray!

  1. Here is an idea. Do you use Windows? There is a program called Voice Recorder. Make sure the mic is first set up on the system, then start recording with Voice Recorder.
    Don’t listen to it. Then, unplug the mic.
    Listen to his recording.
    If the mic is an output device, how does the computer know to play the sound?
    In fact, how did the sound even *get* onto the computer?
    It must have been via the mic.

    I just use Voice Recorder as an example, because it is probably the easiest on Windows. But any platform, any kind of voice recording software should do the trick.

    Liked by 2 people

    1. Hahaha! I wish I was able to think about that last nightโ€”- I got so frustrated with the way he protests against what I was teaching that I never bothered to innovate ๐Ÿ˜…๐Ÿ˜…๐Ÿ˜… but I will do that now… ๐Ÿ™ thanks for the advise! Will do that!

      Liked by 1 person

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